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Measure & Analyze: Live Q &A, March 1st from 10am - 10:45am CST

 Welcome! Emerson experts below will be here LIVE on March 1st, 10:00am - 10:45am CST to help you tackle your toughest challenges...

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Rachelle McWright | Community Manager, Emerson Exchange 365

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51 Replies

  • Greetings.

    I am interested in the listing of international standards/codes pertaining to design, manufacture, testing and performance of the following equipment :

    1. CEMS
    2. Gas Chromatography

    (for example, Steam and Water Sampling System (SWAS System) uses ASME PTC 19.11 code of year 2008 edition.

    The international standards/codes that applies - can be American, European Union, and Japan. Normally for our projects, the use of standards/codes from India, China and Korea are not permitted for our clients.
    The listing of standards/codes will help us to write competitive and better Technical Specifications and Request For Quotation (RFQ) in the future.
  • In reply to Ramesh Nair:

    Karl Stappert: I have a CMF100 Coriolis flow meter that we use to measure heavy furnace oil(HFO) as it is delivered to a silo. We have had issues in reconciling the delivered product by truck vs the captured quantity by the meter. We did use Prolink II to harvest as much info as possible to no success. My drive gain has in most occasions been maxing and a times getting erratic readings. We did enable en-trained air compensation but still we seem not to be heading anywhere. Could you kindly assist.
  • In reply to mukaka:

    Ramesh, What is the orientation of the Coriolis sensor? For HFO flange inlet to outlet axis in horizontal mount with tubes down is recommended. If you believe you have air entrainment then flange inlet to outlet axis in vertical mount with tubes in flag position with flowing up is preferred. Check drive gain when you are flowing and when you are not flowing. If drive gain maxes-out while flowing and drops down to normal when not flowing your pumping process is most likely pulling air into the flow lines. Also, check the density while flowing and when not flowing. If density drops while flowing and drive gain elevates or maxes out this is a good indication of air entrainment. High differentials across a pump with leaky seals on the pump or upstream flanges can cause air entrainment. Investigate further and let us know what you find. If the problem is not readily obvious by what you find, I would recommend having one of our Emerson service technicians come on-site and investigate.

  • In reply to Karl Stappert:

    The meter is in a horizontal axis with the tube facing down. The density as previously observed is never constant when product is flowing. Is there a stipulated distance that should be maintained between the pump and the meter? I thought after having a NRV downstream would always make the pipe full and possibly eliminate most of traces of en-trained air. We will be running product through soon and I will capture more data and share.
  • In reply to mukaka:

    Hello , Friendly Reminder to join us LIVE tomorrow for the event at 10am CST. and others will be online in the community to answer your questions. (FYI, there is a 2nd event for AP/India on March 2nd at 1:00 pm Singapore time. You can find that event here: http://emrsn.co/MAexperts2

    Best Regards,

    Rachelle McWright | Community Manager, Emerson Exchange 365

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  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    We're gearing up to get started! As a reminder, please REPLY to this thread with your questions. You may need to refresh your browser on occasion or use the page forward (blue arrows) as the discussion progesses...

    Best Regards,

    Rachelle McWright | Community Manager, Emerson Exchange 365

    Share. Learn. Network

  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    Hi Rachelle and everyone, I am excited about our live event today and looking forward to your questions. Let know any questions you have about flow measurement.

  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    G'day Rachelle, Shane here, ready to answer any questions!

    Shane Hale | Global Business Development Director - Rosemount Wireless | Emerson Automation Solutions

    shane.hale@emerson.com | T +1 952 204 4737 | M +1 713 447 2839

  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    Hi, Ulf Johannesson is online. I'm ready for questions and discussions around tank gauging and overfill prevention.
  • In reply to Karl Stappert:

    Hello All - Wally is here and looking forward to answering your Pressure questions!
  • In reply to mukaka:

    Hi Mukaka, There is not a specified minimum distance between the pump and the flow meter, further apart is better though. Centrifugal pumps are preferred because they cause less pulsations, but pulsations should only cause your flow rate and drive gain to bounce a lot. Pulsations should not max out your drive gain unless they are severe and if so I would expect your drive gain to sweep back and forth from high to low. A NRV only eliminates reverse flow typically it won’t stop air from getting into the system upstream of the Coriolis meter or eliminate vapor breakout if the system is idle and the piping heats up mid-day with sun on it. Let me know what you find out next time you capture data.
  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    I came across a question in my travels around LinkedIn about what are some general guidelines when choosing between RTDs and thermocouples for temperature measurement
  • In reply to Rachelle McWright:

    Hello! Ingemar is available to assist you with your questions!
  • In reply to Shane Hale:

    Hi Shane. Sam here. I was wondering how do you see SIL requirements affecting gas analyzers for process control and gas quality going forward?
  • In reply to Jim Cahill:

    RTDs are generally more accurate and stable than thermocouples. Thermocouples are better in high vibration environments and have higher temperature limits.